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It is never personal, you're not the protagonist

It's so easy to become offended. It actually comes pretty natural. Someone says something.  You feel it's directed at you Strong reaction follows No need to react, it's got nothing to do with you as a person Imagine some remarks about academic work versus manual one, a bit dismissive about the latter. You don't have a degree and never wanted one. You know very well it takes years of experience and training to do what you're doing. Talent is involved too, as some people do have "two left hands".  You still feel you should add something to the conversation, but not sure if it is going to be well-received. No need to enlighten the other party right now Most people think in terms of opposites. If it's not this, it's that and it can't be anything else. Certainty of one's convictions is also a form of self-reassurance that everything is stable in one's world. Other points of view cannot be allowed because they are disruptive. Cognitive disrup

Non-digital parents, digital native children

It's not all doom and gloom, after all. Or is it?

Kids no longer play by themselves in the streets of most western cities, lovers spend time copious amounts of time looking at their phone instead of gazing at each other adoringly, emoticons and gifs have replaced emotional exchanges of words. Families and friends, united by devices.

So what? Digital natives have not been left with a huge void in their lives and the non-digital generation should not fear their offspring is going to grow into some mutated half-VR creature.

If anything, there is currently too much choice, a sure source of neurosis. Shall I do this or shall I do that? Go on Twitter or Reddit? Post something on Facebook or Instagram? Actually the latter dilemma has been solved, as you can post on both at the same time.

It is true that parenting is now much harder than it used to be 30 years ago, when the framework of daily life was pretty fixed. There was no escape from the physical confines, so any venturing outside them had to be imaginary or risk a very short existence.

The internet has brought its revolutionary flag and planted right in the middle of a rather sedate social structure, with its predictable rules. Revolutions are messy and test the best of the best, let alone the laggards.

Parts of the internet are terribly ugly, true. Other parts are very interesting and some are downright fascinating. Parents and kids need a new level of communication, that goes beyond snatching mobile phones and banning access.

For once, instead of issuing orders and expecting compliance, a lot of real, face-to-face talking and negotiating is needed. No more 'do as you are told'. Will parents be able to extricate themselves from inherited patterns of thinking and acting? Now that's the real challenge. Just when they thought they could have some peace and quiet after all those turbulent toddler years.




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