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It is never personal, you're not the protagonist

It's so easy to become offended. It actually comes pretty natural. Someone says something.  You feel it's directed at you Strong reaction follows No need to react, it's got nothing to do with you as a person Imagine some remarks about academic work versus manual one, a bit dismissive about the latter. You don't have a degree and never wanted one. You know very well it takes years of experience and training to do what you're doing. Talent is involved too, as some people do have "two left hands".  You still feel you should add something to the conversation, but not sure if it is going to be well-received. No need to enlighten the other party right now Most people think in terms of opposites. If it's not this, it's that and it can't be anything else. Certainty of one's convictions is also a form of self-reassurance that everything is stable in one's world. Other points of view cannot be allowed because they are disruptive. Cognitive disrup

Dear Cinderella


 

If you read this and you think it's an exercise in self-victimisation, you are so right and you should stop...  at the full stop.

You came to this blog to find out something new, insightful and useful when talking to people you need to impress.

Did you?  It's very unlikely that anyone would spend any amount of time reading about another inner crisis and how to overcome it in 10 steps.

Where is the self-victimisation, you may ask. Hang on a minute, it's round the corner, just needs to be summoned.

Let us get Cinderella first, the one and only rags-to-princess story that makes grown-ups, irrespective of gender, fantasise about miracles and chance.

Has anyone felt bit Cinderelly while toiling in a very normal existence? Was there any remote possibility of a fairy godmother? 

If the answer is no, you have a second opportunity to stop reading, yet again, at the upcoming full stop.

What comes next is for Cinderella types, those who dance away the night, but just one night only, and then have to run back to their regular life.

Before that exceptional event, days were filled with dreams and nights with nightmares.  Feelings of enormous potency would colour the world in pastel colours. Reality would be howling somewhere around, but never close enough to change the mood. 

Things were good and they became ecstatically so on the night of the ball at the castle. Unfortunately, they forgot to freeze time and it all came, very soon, to an end, when the clock struck midnight.

You will remember that rushing out, Cinderella lost one of her golden shoes. 

Thanks to this piece of footwear,  she was found eventually and got to live happily ever after.

No one else, as far as we know, got beyond losing a shoe and realising they have never left their normal existence. The interludes are part of that cunning scheme called Maya.

No, it's not the great ancient civilisation once so vibrant on the South-American continent, it is the arch-mistress of illusions. If falling prey to it is not a good enough reason to feel like a victim in the game of life, then think again.

Realists and pragmatists, try and feel sorry a bit for the eternal Cinderellas whose shoes never become a pair again.



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