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Don’t despise the self-help boom, it's all self-expression

The title of this blog post, it sounds a bit like marketing advice, doesn’t it?  It’s got nothing to do with marketing.
If there was a form to fill, something along the line of “conflict of interests or disclosure”, it would contain a bold-faced and in capital letters 'NO'.
Nothing to sell or flog, no book or method or suggestions. Just amazement at an ever-increasing number of people who have lived to tell the story of extricating themselves from some form of personal hell or making it in the bigger hostile world. Maybe finding the Holy Grail of human interactions.
Before the internet, the number of people who had garnered enough authority to dispense recommendations was pretty limited.
Dale Carnegie comes to mind, as a random name. John Grey is another one, of a more recent past.




Nowadays, the vast marketplace called social media is full of new authors and there is a surge of passion to help 'the other ones" help themselves.
It would not take a very powerful computer to count the words "how to..."  being repeated online,  signposts of an original or not so original take on certain existential or practical woes.
From broken hearts to hacking longevity or just a better life, from demon-slaying journeys to guided trips to serenity, it's all out there.
Some publish their work in traditional book format, others broadcast themselves on multiple audio and video channels. A cohort of followers is useful, but not necessary, because what matters most is finding one's voice.
There has never been a time, it seems, when the individual is both empowered and freed by the new digital medium.
Is there a lot of transient or recycled knowledge out there? Of course there is. Does it matter? Of course not. Abundance is always useful, because it dissolves timidity. As there is so much going on, the shy and the quiet ones must feel encouraged to add their voice to it
.
Not everyone can be an opera star, but there is joy in being part of the choir too.

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