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Everyman and everywoman and every habit

It’s been repeated so many times that it has lost any trace of meaning: ‘we are all creatures of habit’.
Waking up at the same hour every day, buying the same brand of toothpaste and using the same type of toothbrush.
Toaster set at 3 for the perfect slice of bread ready to be buttered, oven temperature at 220 Celsius or point 7 for the ideal roast.  Dinner at 6.30.
Thankfully, the gods of consumerism and commercial greed will not allow too much self-indulging in the comfort zone. If they can’t change out habits, they will at least change our desires.
What ambitions and lust for glory never achieve at personal level is easily done by advertisers. It would take most people a lot of persuading and motivation to move closer to a childhood dream. It only takes a couple of well-placed and well-crafted ads to stir up unknown hunger for a new perfume. Or car. Or cardigan. Holidays that involve lots of money, preparations and distant travel become a lifelong objective and no effort is spared to achieve it.
By comparison, a walk to a friend’s house or to the parents’ grave is put off day after day and pushed to the back of the consciousness, together with unpleasant memories and repressed teenage impulses.
We may be masters of our desires as long as we live on top of a mountain surrounded by very deep waters and no internet connection.
Save for that, in a subtle way, what we want is already enslaved by what others want us to have. Or, to be really precise, to buy.

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